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Research (Finding Information)

PRIMARY SOURCES vs SECONDARY SOURCES

 - Based on first-hand, personal experience.

 - Author experienced or witnessed event.

 - Usually written at the same time or shortly after the event occurred.

 - Generally does not include compilation/analysis of other sources.

 - Original scientific research; experiment or study conducted by the author.

 - Factual rather than interpretive.

 

 - Based on second-hand information.

 - Author did NOT witness the event.

 - Usually written somewhat later or much later after the event occurred.

 - Interprets primary sources, often many together, draws conclusions.

 - Compilation, discussion, analysis, or criticism of scientific research by others.

 - Analyzes and interprets.

Content courtesy of Erin Cassidy, Sam Houston State University Library 2013

PRIMARY Sources:

  • First-hand accounts by people who experienced event.
  • A person's account of own feelings, actions, or experiences.
  • Object or document that comes directly from person/place/event researched.

SECONDARY Sources:

  • Second-hand accounts by people who did not experience event.
  • One person's account of someone else's feelings, actions, or experiences.
  • Object or document that originates much later than person/place/event researched.
  • Contains INTERPRETATIONS, analysis, synthesis.

Content Versus Format:

  • Is a newspaper always primary, and is a book always secondary? NO.
  • "Primary" and "secondary" relate to the CONTENT, not the format.
  • Primary sources OFTEN appear in document types such as letters and newspapers, but a source doesn't have to be primary just because of its format. The same is true of sources on paper versus sources on the Internet, and sources which are duplicated as they appear (by scanning or photographing) versus sources which are transcribed (retyped word for word in plain text) -- it's the content that counts.

It's All About CONTEXT:

  • There is nothing inherent in a document or object that automatically makes it always "primary" or "secondary."
  • YOUR RESEARCH QUESTION determines whether the source is primary or secondary for YOUR research.
  • The same document could be a primary source for one paper and a secondary source for another paper.
  • Example: 1975 biography about Abraham Lincoln would probably be a...
    -- Secondary source if you are studying Lincoln’s life.
    -- Primary source if you are studying how people wrote historical biographies in the 1970s.

Content courtest of Erin Cassidy, Sam Houston State University Library 2013

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